I AM SO THERE

In 1976 an American musical drama film premiered telling the story of a woman (Played by Barbra Streisand) an easy listening folksie type ingenue who enters the music business, and meets and falls in love with an established male rock’n’roll star (Played by Kris Kristofferson.)

I remember being so viscerally moved by Streisand’s performance that I have been a fan of Streisand ever since.

I ALREADY Know that I am going to: LOVE, LOVE, LOVE THIS MOVIE!

And (This is big so pay attention bitches) I predict: Oscar nomination[s].

I don’t make many  Academy Award predictions, although the three predictions that I did make for the movies: La Vie En Rose, Black Swan and The Artist did come true in the Best Actress and Best picture categories.

When I viewed the Official trailer for the latest remake of: A Star Is Born, I got that same feeling and I don’t whether it was because she used her original name (Stefani Germanotta) for the character of Esther Hoffman, or because of the absence of the garish and outlandish get ups worn (meat dresses etc.)

i knew however, that his movie looks like it has the potential for being  something really special and director and star: Bradley Cooper will have had to create a ‘Cluster Fcuk’ of a product for this successful formula to fail.

It all started in 1937 with Janet Gaynor & Frederick March and then in  1954 with Judy Garland and James Mason to Streisand and Kristofferson in a story of an ambitious female newcomer who catches the eye and support of a celebrity with a reputation for being difficult, and as her star rises, his fades with heartbreaking results.

While the necessity for the existence of a remake is always questioned, A Star Is Born is one case where every new version updated it for the times in completely understandable ways.

Whereas the pre-1970s versions depicted  the male character’s struggle with his vice of choice which happened to be alcohol. Later versions were inclusive of the impact of drugs as well.

 

Judy Garland’s version was also about Hollywood but at the height of its musical phase; Garland’s Esther Blodgett is already an established singer and it’s her voice that prompts Mason’s Norman Maine to help her to shoot for something bigger through the studio system.

In 1976, Streisand’s version ignores Hollywood (In the context of movies) and shifts the focus to the  rock-and-roll scene of the ‘70s the voice of her renamed Esther Hoffman catches the ear of not a movie star but rock star John Norman Howard (Kristofferson). All three films see Esther and her self-destructive benefactor share wedded bliss that is sadly short-lived, and the final scenes, while handled in different ways, are essentially the same.

42 years ago America was graced with this iconic song from Barbra Steisand:

Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson: Evergreen – A Star is Born.

What makes this movie addictive is that all versions of: A Star Is Born have shrewd dialogue, musical numbers  and a bittersweet and passionate ending (With the 1976 remake so far being the only version to actually end with a musical performance (By Streisand).

This story of success, love, and loss in the entertainment industry  has proven its staying power, and although I’m always dubious about remakes, this is one tale that can support further re-tellings.

So here’s to Esther or Stephanie and John or Norman in the Weekend movie:

Watch Here

If this movie is taken down, it WILL be replaced and your location will be blocked.

 

 


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