You Be The Judge Because Size MATTERS

This is an aerial view of attendees at Donald Trump’s 2017 Inauguration:

US President Donald Trump and his spokesperson Sean Spicer, have chastised US media outlets, accusing reporters of understating the numbers of supporters present during the inauguration.

Where does Spicer think he is Kindergarten?

“I made a speech. I looked out, the field was, it looked like a million, million and a half people,” he told CIA staff. “They showed a field where there was practically nobody standing there. And they said, Donald Trump, did not draw well.”

Trump claimed 250,000 gathered at the stage area while the rest of his supporters stretched over “20-block area,” all the way back to the Washington Monument.

The Joint Congressional Committee for Inaugural Ceremonies distributed about 250,000 tickets for Trump’s inauguration. However, most onlookers go beyond the ticketed area to watch proceedings from the National Mall.

During the ceremony, news outlets started comparing side-by-side shots of Friday’s ceremony alongside the 2009 inauguration of Barack Obama, noticing the sharp contrast in crowd numbers.

The images used showed a significantly smaller crowd on the National Mall for Trump’s event than for Obama’s oath ceremony, where in 2009, it’s believed some 1.8 million people attended the inauguration.

The exact size of the crowd for Trump’s inauguration will most likely never be known, as the National Parks Service stopped providing estimates in the ‘90s. But whatever was reported on Friday, Trump called a “lie.”

“So we caught them and we caught them in a beauty and I think they’re going to pay a big price,” said Trump.

Later in the day, the new White House press secretary, Sean Spicer, accused the media of “deliberately false reporting” on the crowd’s size.

“This was the largest audience to ever witness an inauguration, period!” Spicer said. “These attempts to lessen the enthusiasm of the inauguration are shameful and wrong.”

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U.S. President Donald Trump

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Following the criticism, media outlets had to do some fact checking. A number of agencies, including the Associated Press, concluded that Trump’s estimates are wrong.

“Trump is wrong. Photos of the National Mall from his inauguration make clear that the crowd did not extend to the Washington Monument. Large swaths of empty space are visible on the Mall,” AP said.

AFP sad that Trump “falsely claimed there were people stretching from the steps of the Capitol, where he spoke, along 20 blocks back to the Washington Monument.”

In addition to using photos as evidence, AP reported that hotels across the District of Columbia reported a lot of vacancies.

Statistics from Washington’s Metro system was also cited. By 11 am. EST on Friday, only 193,000 trips were taken, while in 2009 that number stood at 513,000 trips. Even at Obama’s second inauguration in 2013, the number was higher with 317,000 people taking commute.

Separately Nielsen Holdings, a global information measurement company revealed, that some 31 million US viewers tuned into 12 broadcast and cable networks on Friday to watch Donald Trump take the presidential oath.

The top three included Fox News Channel with 8.43 million viewers, NBC with 5.8 million, followed by ABC with 4.9 million.

Trump’s inauguration event views however, beat Barack Obama’s second inauguration viewership figures when 20.6 million watched in 2013. Trump failed to top Obama’s first inauguration in 2009, witnessed by 37.8 million people.

Comparing Trump’s

inauguration crowd to the Women’s March

On the other hand, the Women’s March filled the streets around the mall. Those streets were closed to Trump supporters.

His inauguration was on Jan. 20, because of the Constitution, which this year occurred on a Friday. The Women’s March was on Saturday, when more people are off work.

Metro, Washington’s subway system, tweeted Saturday there were 275,000 trips taken Saturday by 11 a.m.

On Friday, there were 193,000 trips by 11 a.m., according to Metro.

Another important point: Both events are occurring in an area opposed to Trump. Washington, D.C. voted overwhelmingly against Trump last November. He got just 4.1% of the vote in the nation’s capital. He also lost the surrounding states of Maryland by 25 percentage points and Virginia by nearly 5 percentage points. It would be a longer trip for a critical mass of Trump supporters than for a critical mass of marchers.

It should also be noted that marchers took to the streets in other cities, nationwide, and in cities around the world.

Source: www.womensmarch.com

 

Comparing Donald Trump and Barack Obama’s inaugural crowd sizes

http://www.redstate.com/uploads/2017/01/obama-trump-crowds-e1485012257264.jpg

“Sister marches” also took place in Chicago:

Protesters cheer at the Women's March in Chicago, Illinois.

Protesters cheer at the Women’s March in Chicago, Illinois.

And New York:

Thousands of participants converge on Dag Hammarskjold Plaza and 2nd Avenue during the Women's March in New York City.

Thousands of participants converge on Dag Hammarskjold Plaza and 2nd Avenue during the Women’s March in New York City.

And in Boston:

Here are some of the best pictures from American cities:

Demonstrators wearing pink hats gather during the Women's March on Washington in Washington, DC, on Saturday, January 21, 2017.

A large crowd walks down Pennsylvania Avenue after the start of the Women's March on Washington in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, January 21. Organizers said the march is sending a message to Donald Trump that "women's rights are human rights." Similar protests unfolded across the country.

Photos: Women’s March on Washington

A large crowd walks down Pennsylvania Avenue after the start of the Women’s March on Washington in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, January 21. Organizers said the march is sending a message to Donald Trump that “women’s rights are human rights.” Similar protests unfolded across the country.

 

A large crowd walks down Pennsylvania Avenue after the start of the Women's March on Washington in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, January 21. Organizers said the march is sending a message to Donald Trump that "women's rights are human rights." Similar protests unfolded across the country.

Photos: Women’s March on Washington

A large crowd walks down Pennsylvania Avenue after the start of the Women’s March on Washington in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, January 21. Organizers said the march is sending a message to Donald Trump that “women’s rights are human rights.” Similar protests unfolded across the country.

 

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And images from other countries, too:

Source: www.womensmarch.com

Protesters gather outside the US Embassy in London.

 

A woman wears a US flag like a hijab during a protest of US Democrats Abroad in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin on January 21, 2017, one day after the inauguration of the US President.

Photos: Women’s marches around the world

A woman wears a US flag like a hijab during a protest of US Democrats Abroad in front of the Brandenburg Gate in Berlin on January 21, 2017, one day after the inauguration of the US President.

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Activists gather in Civic Center Park for the Women's March on Denver on Saturday, January 21.

Photos: Women’s marches around the world

Activists gather in Civic Center Park for the Women’s March on Denver on Saturday, January 21.

 

Supporters in the Antarctic Peninsula take part in a women's march on Saturday, January 21. According to organizers, the march includes about 30 people who are eco-minded tourists and non-government scientists. Some held signs saying, "Penguins for Peace" and "Seals for Science."

Photos: Women’s marches around the world

Supporters in the Antarctic Peninsula take part in a women’s march on Saturday, January 21. According to organizers, the march includes about 30 people who are eco-minded tourists and non-government scientists. Some held signs saying, “Penguins for Peace” and “Seals for Science.”

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Demonstrators gather in Oslo, Norway, on Saturday, January 21, to show solidarity with the Women's March on Washington and other protests around the world. The goal of the marches is to raise awareness of women's rights and other civil rights participants fear could be threatened under Donald Trump's presidency.

Photos: Women’s marches around the world

Demonstrators gather in Oslo, Norway, on Saturday, January 21, to show solidarity with the Women’s March on Washington and other protests around the world. The goal of the marches is to raise awareness of women’s rights and other civil rights participants fear could be threatened under Donald Trump’s presidency.